Curriculum

Program Structure

The DBA Program encompasses 60 credit hours and takes approximately three years to complete. The program is a professional, non-resident program with limited visits to campus allowing participants maximum flexibility to complete their studies without having to sacrifice time away from family and their careers. Over the course of the three-year program, participants will need to make only one or two trips to campus per term. The program consists of the following components:

  • Fall of Year 1:
    • Foundations Review: 12 half-day sessions where each half-day session consists of four hours of instruction (3 credit hours).
    • Managerial Statistics: 6 days, 5.5 hours of instruction per day (3 credit hours).
  • Terms (6): Participants take 6 credit hours in each term for a total of 36 credit hours. Courses in terms 1-6 have both an online and on-campus component.
  • Research Process: A three-stage process that takes places over the 3 years of the DBA program.
  • Final Research Project: Terms 7, 8 and 9 are devoted to research symposiums and the final project (18 credit hours).

Courses

  • Research Analysis in Accounting:

    Instructor: Gary McGill

    This course reviews scholarly accounting research. Such research encompasses several topics and uses various methods. Topics addressed include the use of accounting information by investors and other stakeholders, the role of accounting in capital markets, accounting standard setting, the use of accounting information in budgeting, compensation, and governance, the role of auditing, and tax compliance and tax policy. Methods include analysis of archival data, behavioral experiments, surveys, and analytical modeling.

  • Change Leadership:

    Instructor: Joyce Bono

    The focus of this course is on individual and organizational factors that lead to successful initiation and institutionalization of both large and small change initiatives. Topics included in the course include process models of change as well as obstacles and barriers to change. The focus will be on leadership and group processes that facilitate or inhibit change, as well as the personal characteristics of leaders and employees that affect change. Principles of motivation and influence will also be covered in this course.

  • Corporate Finance:

    Instructor: Michael Ryngaert

    The course will begin with the conditions under which financing and payout policy decisions do not matter – the Classic Miller & Modigliani world. The course will then be organized the course around "market imperfections" that make financial decisions important. How do taxes influence financial decisions? How does asymmetric information and agency costs influence decisions. How do potential market inefficiencies affect financing decisions? How do behavioral biases that deviate from "rational economic man" influence decision making? The course will be part lecture, but students will also be given a paper to analyze, critique, and make suggestions for extensions. While exposure to financial theory is important, there will be more emphasis on testing theories using various empirical tools.

  • Entrepreneurship:

    Instructor: Michael Morris

    What is the nature of entrepreneurial behavior? How can we better understand such behavior at the individual, organizational and societal levels? What are the conditions and factors that enable such behavior across different contexts? This course will explore these and related questions from both a theoretical and managerial/applied perspective, while employing perspectives from across a range of disciplines. Entrepreneurship will be approached as the nexus of attractive opportunities and enterprising individuals, and hence aspects of opportunity recognition and opportunity exploitation are examined. Central to our investigation will be the process perspective and how it contributes a richer understanding of entrepreneurial phenomena. Consideration will be given to a range of topics, including risk-taking, entrepreneurial orientation, cognition and the entrepreneur, effectuation and resourcing strategies, entrepreneurial competencies, business model innovation, adaptation and emergence, entrepreneurial teams, venture growth, and failure. The course will highlight research approaches that can enhance managerial insights and facilitate entrepreneurial practice.

  • International Business:

    Instructor: Andy Naranjo

    This DBA seminar is designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the academic research and practice of international business and finance. Both in and out of class discussions and assignments will provide students with the knowledge and skills they will need to critically evaluate scholarly research in international business and finance and make original research contributions to the corresponding academic and professional areas. Each student should be able to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the extant international business and finance literature and develop an original research paper outline that extends the knowledge in a specific area of international business and finance.

    This course covers the core applied and theoretical underpinnings of international business and finance. Drawing on the research related to multinational firms, international trade, and international finance, this course provides a solid framework for all DBA students. Some of the major topics covered include the nature and role of multinational firms, international trade and FDI theory, the impact of globalization, global institutions, features that distinguish international finance from domestic finance, foreign exchange foundations, markets and determination, foreign exchange exposure and management, and international financial markets and investments.

  • Managerial Economics:

    Instructor: Elias Dinopoulos

    This class will focus on the decision-making process of business executives. It provides a comprehensive treatment of economic principles used explicitly or implicitly in determining the market behavior of consumers and firms. The course is theory based but practice and research oriented. Business decisions often require numerical solutions, and therefore algebraic, geometric and game theoretic techniques will be developed and used. Research tools and methodology used in economics and research-oriented topics will be presented.

    The class will address several basic topics of managerial economics including the following. Firm boundaries: What are the horizontal and vertical boundaries of the firm and its determinants? What should a firm do, how large should it be, and what business should it be in? Market and competitive analysis: What is the nature of the markets in which the firm competes and the determinants of market structure? How does the firm identify actual and potential competitors and what is the best way to deal with them? Positioning: How does the firm create economic value? How should the firm position itself to compete, what should be the basis for competitive advantage, and how should the firm adjust its position over time?

  • Marketing Strategy:

    Instructor: Deb Mitra

    Marketing strategy is concerned with the choices and planning of a firm’s resources to achieve its marketing objectives in a target market. It involves analysis and decision making regarding marketing goal setting, target market selection, desired positioning as well as resource allocation. This course will examine key topics in the study of marketing strategy by reviewing the extant literature. Students will be encouraged to challenge assumptions, frameworks, and findings in this research. The course will offer a springboard for new questions, ideas, and frameworks to enrich and extend our understanding on marketing strategy.

  • Organizational Behavior:

    Instructor: Amir Erez

    How do we make sense of people in organizations? What do we know about the organizational context in which we encounter them? And how do we make use of this contextual and interpretational knowledge when we attempt to understand and predict individuals’ behavior? These are some of the questions we will attempt to answer in this course. This course is about the scientific study of human cognition as it is related to organizational studies. The main topic of this course is the knowledge encountered in the workplace and how is it used in activities such as forming impressions of others, explaining individuals’ behavior, and forming managerial decisions. Thus, in this course we will consider topics ranging from basic perception through cognitive organization and interpretation to complex decision making. Theories and methods developed in management, behavioral economics, and cognitive and social psychology will be examined and we will discuss how they can be specifically applied to topics in management. In the process of discussing these topics we will also learn how to use research tools to investigate these issues.

  • Organizational Research Methods:

    Instructor: Phil Podsakoff

    In their classic book on experimental and quasi-experimental designs for research, Campbell and Stanley (1963) noted that the model for their work was provided by McCall (1923), who stated that although:

    "[While]...there are excellent books and courses of instruction dealing with the statistical manipulation of experimental data,... there is little help to be found on the methods of securing adequate and proper data to which to apply statistical procedures... (p. 1)"

    Similar points regarding the importance of research methodology (versus statistical analysis) have also been made by Keppel and Zedeck (1991, p. 12), who noted that:

    "Though there are numerous techniques of data analysis, no techniques, regardless of its elegance, sophistication, and power can save the research when the design is poor, improper, confounded, or misguided. As we have stated, and will state again, sound inferences and generalizations from a piece of research are a function of design and not statistical analysis"

    Within the context of the above statements, the primary purpose of this seminar is to prepare doctoral candidates to design and conduct research in the organizational and behavioral sciences. Consistent with the focus of the books by McCall (1923) , Campbell and Stanley (1963), and Keppel and Zedeck (1991), the emphasis of this course will be on exploring: (a) the logic of research design, (b) different types of research methodologies, and (c) issues that researchers encounter when using these methodologies. Although the discussion of various analytical procedures will be unavoidable, the major focus of the seminar will be on methodological issues, as opposed to analytical/statistical issues.

  • Quantitative Research Methods:

    Instructor: Steve Shugan

    This is a doctoral-level course introducing multivariate data analysis and mathematical models in marketing theory often called marketing science.

    The first part of the course covers basic multivariate data analysis with applications for business, marketing research and consumer behavior. The course covers many different multivariate techniques focusing on applications and research design. In class examples use SPSS but this IT IS NOT A COURSE ON STATISTICAL SOFTWARE. Moreover, very little class time is devoted to software and students are free to use different software packages.

    The second part of the course covers recent and traditional applications of mathematical and economic models related to marketing problems. Course readings cover both classic and state-of-the-art articles in marketing science. Discussion of readings emphasizes model applications while spending some time on model development. However, model development is not the central focus of the course. Topics for this part vary by semester but often include models for new product design, forecasting demand, advertising, distribution channels, price promotions, customer response and services.

  • Strategic Management:

    Instructor: Gwen Lee

    The objective of the course is to cultivate strategy scholars who can synthesize and translate theoretical and empirical research in an authoritative evidential manner that makes these findings accessible for academic readers as well as existing and future "thought leaders."

    The course content focuses on value creation, value appropriation, and value innovation. The course participants will develop: (a) Reviews of what we already know; (b) Integration of diverse theories and empirical findings that inform in a new and interesting way; (c) Forward-looking expositions that integrate and articulate existing theory and findings with new and provocative ideas; and (d) Integration of theory and research in management with related advances in other non-management sciences and disciplines.

    Course projects may include: (a) Important and interesting replications/extensions of prior findings that significantly change our understanding of an issue or its boundary conditions; (b) Timely evidence about phenomena that have or may have implications for public policy or managerial practice, (e.g., regarding the effects of economic conditions, corporate governance, contemporary management practices, changing employment conditions); (c) Evidence that informs major scholarly debates in the field of management and organizations; (d) New evidence-based assessments of managerial and organizational interventions.

  • Supply Chain Strategy:

    Instructor: Janice Carrillo

    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and tools applied in supply chain management. Utilizing a strategic supply chain point of view, emphasis will be placed on such topics as supply chain structure, information flows, supplier selection, and environmental supply chain issues. Contemporary research directions in supply chain management will also be identified and investigated.

Research Process

In lieu of a comprehensive exam on content, students have to meet the research-related standards reflected in the following three-stage process:

End of first year:
At the end of the summer term of their first year, DBA students will submit a paper that identifies an important research question, provide a review of the relevant literature surrounding that question, and puts together a project plan for investigating that question (i.e., a plan explaining exactly how any initial qualitative or quantitative research would be performed). Based on the focus of this proposal, the student will be assigned a faculty advisor as they move into their second year. The faculty advisor will provide feedback on the project plan and interact with the student during the second year as they work on the project plan implementation.

End of spring term of second year:
During May of the second year, the student will submit a complete paper that is 'conference ready'. That is, the paper will be of sufficient quality to warrant submission to an academic conference (consistent with the list of conferences suggested by the faculty advisor). An assessment of the paper by the faculty advisor will serve as the doctoral student qualifier. Based on a positive assessment, a two-member doctoral committee would be formed by the student. The committee could include one outside member, such as emeriti faculty or one from another college.

Beginning of fall term of the third year:
At the end of August or early September of the second year, the student will submit a final project proposal to the doctoral committee and defend it orally. The proposal will have two components. The first of these is an updated or revised version of the paper submitted in May of the second year. The second component is a detailed description of the next stage of research to be completed on the topic. This will include the aspects of the research question they will be investigating beyond what was done in the initial paper, and a methodology to guide the next stage of the research. Another possibility is that the student could be striking out in an entirely different direction than the paper submitted in May. In this instance, they will submit and defend an appropriate literature review and research plan for the new research question.

In addition to assessing the proposal itself, the oral defense will ensure the student's mastery of the relevant literature surrounding the project topic. If the oral defense is passed, the student becomes a DBA candidate, qualified to complete their final project and earn the degree. Any student who fails the oral defense will be permitted to re-take it one time.

Final Research Project

The final research project will be supervised by a committee consisting of at least two graduate faculty members. At least one member will be from the Warrington College of Business Administration and at least one member may be drawn from a different discipline.

  • The doctoral committee will be formed no later than the end of the fourth term.
  • By the end of the seventh term, the student must make a formal presentation of the final project proposal to the supervisory committee.
  • Once the proposal is approved by the committee, the student works under the committee's supervision to complete the final project and sit for the final oral defense at the end of the ninth term.
  • In the event that a project cannot be completed in term 9 and the student receives an incomplete grade, the student will continue working with the doctoral committee and will have to register for at least three credits (if summer, two credits) in each term he/she does not graduate.

Research Symposium

During Research Symposium weekends each student will present their current research to faculty and peers. Additionally, faculty members will also present current research to the DBA class.

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College Info

Warrington College of Business Administration
100 BRY
PO Box 117150
Gainesville, FL 32611-7150
Phone: 352.392.2397
Fax: 352.392.2086

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