Active Learning

Classrooms that are student-centered rather than instructor-centered encourage students to actively engage in the material being taught instead of passively listening and taking notes. This type of learning environment requires students to be prepared for class, as they will need to actively participate and comment in discussion. Active learning encourages students to view peers and the community as additional authorities on the subject they are learning.

Flipping Not Just for Classrooms

Posted on April 07, 2014 by Sarah Bleakney

As the post below details, flipping your class can offer a multitude of benefits. However, much of what is written on flipping focuses on the face-to-face classroom. And while flipping classroom courses can offer significant benefits, flipped strategies can have a positive impact on online classes, as well.

A recent article, Can You Flip an Online Class?, argues that we miss opportunities for student engagement and learning if we merely seek to replicate the face-to-face classroom experience for online learners. Instead, the author recommends strategies to flip the online classroom that leverage a variety of technology.

The article has three suggestions for flipped strategies, including creating a scavenger hunt document, incorporating social media, and including assignments that prompt self-reflection. In addition, the Comments section includes a number of suggested flipped strategies. All are worth considering when seeking ways to flip your online class into one that is more active and student-centered.

Flipped Your Classroom Yet?

Posted on January 10, 2014 by Sarah Bleakney

Heard about flipping the classroom, but are unsure what that entails and want to learn more? A blog post by a DePaul mathematics professor provides a great place to start.

As the post outlines, flipping the classroom means replacing classroom lectures and homework with short videos and in-class activities. This approach allows students to watch and re-watch the video content as needed to support their mastery of concepts on their own time. This approach also allows instructors and TAs to use class time to provide personalized feedback and guidance to students as they work individually and in small groups to put the ideas they’ve gleaned from the videos into practice. In essence, flipping your classroom demands that you re-approach how you use class time.

Another way to flip your classroom is to reconceive how you incorporate projects – changing these types of assignments from instructor-directed to student-centered, and making them “an approach to learning rather than something to complete.”

The blog post includes suggestions for how to work around some of the potential challenges of flipping the classroom. It also includes a number of links to resources, including this infographic, which does a great job of visually presenting what the flipped classroom entails and why and how you may want to consider incorporating it into your teaching.

Strategies for Implementing Active Learning

Posted on November 6, 2012 by Tawnya Means

The University of Minnesota has a well-developed resource on Active Learning. You can find specific strategies including ice breaker activities, team and pair tasks, and individual tasks for changing the focus of learning from an instructor-focused environment to an environment that turns more of the responsibility of learning to the students. You can explore their resources.

Additional resources can be found at Geoff Petty’s website.

Search

College Info

Warrington College of Business Administration
100 BRY
PO Box 117150
Gainesville, FL 32611-7150
Phone: 352.392.2397
Fax: 352.392.2086

for Alumni & Friends

Warrington
UF

for Faculty & Staff

for Students

Join the Conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Pinterest
  • Instagram
Share Tweet Email Link +